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Golden Goose Award

The Science Coalition is a founding organization of the Golden Goose Award. The purpose of the Golden Goose Award is to demonstrate the human and economic benefits of federally funded research by highlighting examples of seemingly obscure studies that have led to major breakthroughs and resulted in significant societal impact.


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ScienceWorksForU.S.

ScienceWorksForU.S. is a joint project of The Science Coalition, the Association of American Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities to inform policymakers and the public of the devastating impact that sequestration is having on federally funded scientific research.

Universities conduct the majority of basic scientific and medical research in the United States and, as such, are ground zero for the discovery and innovation that fuels the economy, as well as for the education of future scientists, engineers, doctors, teachers and entrepreneurs.

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Innovation Deficit

Close the Innovation Deficit is an effort by the business, higher education, scientific, and high-tech manufacturing communities who are concerned about cuts and stagnating federal investments in research and higher education at a time when other nations are investing heavily in these areas. The Science Coalition supports the effort to Close the Innovation Deficit and believes sustained federal investments in research and higher education are necessary to develop the ideas, people, and innovations that power our economy, create jobs, improve health, and strengthen our national security.


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SCIENCE 2034

What does science hold for the future? SCIENCE 2034 is an initiative by The Science Coalition to mark our 20th anniversary by looking forward 20 years and focusing on the possibilities of the future.

While we don’t know what the next “Big Thing” will be, we can make some educated predictions about how well-funded scientific research might change our lives and our world. At www.Science2034.org we ask scientists, policymakers and thought leaders to weigh in and tell us what they think science will enable 20 years from now and what that will mean to individuals, society and the world.


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Facts about Basic Research and the Innovation Process

 

  • Universities conduct the majority of basic scientific research in the United States — 53 percent in 2009. Business and industry conduct approximately 20 percent of basic scientific research in the United States.  They focus instead on the later-stage applied research and development that is required to commercialize a product or technology.  

     

  • The federal government is the primary source of funding for basic scientific research conducted in the United States, providing just under 60 percent of funding.  The second largest source of basic research funding is the academic institutions themselves.  Industry funds relatively little basic scientific research, yet relies heavily on that research to help fuel its innovation pipeline.

     

  • Basic scientific research is essential to scientific discovery and understanding. It is the first step in the innovation process. 

     

  • Innovations that flow from university-based basic research are at the root of countless companies, products, technologies, innovations and jobs that we take for granted today.


  • Federal support for basic research is based on scientific merit and competitive peer review.  In order to receive funding, researchers must submit proposals to one of several federal agencies responsible for scientific research in the U.S. These include the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy’s Office of Science, the Department of Commerce, the National Science Foundation, and the National Aeronautics & Space Administration, among others.

     

  • Applications for federal research grants far exceed the availability of funds.  This is a highly competitive process where only the very best proposals – as judged by other scientists – receive funding.  Less than 20 percent of the 49,592 new grant applications reviewed by the National institutes of Health in FY 2011 were funded.  At the National Science Foundation, just over 20 percent of new grant applications were funded in FY 2011 – 11,200 of the 51,600 received.

     

  • The United States leads the world in global research and development expenditures from all sources. However, China and other nations are investing aggressively in R&D in order to enhance their innovation capabilities while U.S. spending as a percentage of GDP has been flat to declining in recent years. 


  • America’s global competitiveness and long-term economic health depends on significant and consistent investment in basic research.

     

 

 

 

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